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Blast From The Past: Tatters

From around 1995, Tatters was a one-shot written by Steven Jones and drawn by me, published by Caliber Press.  Tatters was kind of an odd duck of a comic, part gothic superhero book, part government conspiracy story, with some sci-fi elements and a dystopian future thrown in for good measure.  But the book will always be known to me as (as far as I know) the first comic to model a character after Samuel L. Jackson.  Pulp Fiction was hot at the time, and so I drew in Jackson’s and Travolta’s characters from the movie as the comic’s hard-luck hitmen Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, as a joke.  (The characters are named Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.  You can figure out what happens to them.)

As I understand it, editorial at Caliber wanted to avoid legal problems with celebrity likenesses, and so a goatee was added to the Travolta character, drawn directly onto my artwork.  But Sam Jackson in all his Jules-ian glory remained unaltered, and therefore I think I can brag that I was the first to use Jackson as a comic character.  In these days where nearly every mainstream comic has celebrity stunt casting, and where a Jackson-based character became such a mainstay of an entire comic book line that Jackson himself had to play the movie version of that character (I’m looking at you, Ultimate Nick Fury), I feel totally vindicated.

Maybe later I’ll put up a scan of the Jackson/Travolta caricatures, but right now, here’s the opening prologue of Tatters.  Click on the thumbnails to see the larger scans, taken directly from my original art, inked entirely oldschool with a combination of brushes and Rapidograph pens, and lettered by hand.  Pasteups by rubber cement.

Tatters pg 1Tatters pg 2Tatters pg 3

(Sorry, I had to split pgs. 2 and 3 due to WordPress file size limitations.  They’re meant to be seen as one piece.)

Moris Klaw and Isis

Moris Klaw

Boring technical note:  looks like all the annoying glitches have been taken care of, finally.  For now.

Art once again for the Remake/Remodel thread at Whitechapel forum.  This time drawn using Sketchbook software, which is really the best drawing software I’ve used, as far as I’m concerned. Just a pretty, supple ink brush line, the closest to reality that I’ve encountered.  The one drawback with Sketchbook is that it’s not vectored, so if you have to resize up, the anti-aliasing will size up as well, resulting in blurriness.

As usual, it’s always good to draw on a relatively large canvas size, at a high resolution, and then scale down, like I did here.